Need Help Determining SQL Server Licensing  
Author Message
lrice22





PostPosted: Thu May 20 16:45:55 CDT 2004 Top

SQL Server >> Need Help Determining SQL Server Licensing

Hello. I am trying to get to the bottom of whether our SQL Server 2000
Enterprise license needs to be CAL or per processor. For our INTRANET
applications, it is completely clear and we are already fully licensed.
But for our INTERNET web applications, this is where I am not clear.
Here is the CURRENT licensing that we have for our INTERNET web based
applications:

FRONT-END APPLICATION SERVER [CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET]:
Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition
Windows External Connector License
[Running IIS]

BACK-END SQL SERVER CLUSTER VIRTUAL SERVER [BEHIND FIREWALL ON INTRANET]:
Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
SQL Server 2000, Enterprise Edition - CAL License


We have three types of front-end INTERNET web applications built with
ASP.NET. No end-user from the Internet ever connects DIRECTLY to the
SQL Server database, all connections to the SQL Server are made via the
front-end web application. Please review these three applications and
let me know is our current licensing is in compliance, or if we have to
purchase SQL Server PER PROCESSOR licenses:

APPLICATION #1: This front-end application serves up SQL Server data on
Library events and classes. A Library patron goes to the application
web site and does a search on upcoming events and classes and gets the
results displayed on a web page. The user is ANONYMOUS. The
application which is running on the front-end application server, has a
single SQL Server login to the SQL Server database on the other side of
the firewall.

APPLICATION #2: This front-end application serves up SQL Server data
about GIS Property Images. A citizen homeowner goes to the application
web site and logs into the web application to search for GIS information
on their home. Their user account is stored in a table in SQL Server,
but not a SQL Server login or Windows Login. The application which is
running on the front-end application server, has a single SQL Server
login to the SQL Server database on the other side of the firewall.

APPLICATION #3: This front-end application servers up SQL Server data
about individuals who are put in the County jail. An end-user from the
City of Portland [different organization than the County] connects to
the application web site and their user account [Windows account] is
authenticated via Active Directory by the front-end application. The
end-user then queries for data on County jailed individuals. Then
end-user from the City of Portland has a verified CAL. The application
which is running on the front-end application server, has a single SQL
Server login to the SQL Server database on the other side of the firewall.

Please let me know which, if any, of these three sample applications are
covered with our current CAL-based SQL Server licensing plus the Windows
Server 2003 with Windows External Connector.

Thanks in Advance.

SQL Server51  
 
 
Jacco





PostPosted: Thu May 20 16:45:55 CDT 2004 Top

SQL Server >> Need Help Determining SQL Server Licensing You need a processor license in all scenarios that involve access via the
internet. Only exception is if you have some sort of extranet, with a
limited number of users, when you can buy a CAL for each user. But then, a
processor license is cheaper if you have more than 75 users per processor
for Enterprise Edition, and that's a number that is quite quickly reached.

The scenarios you describe use multiplexing, and it is explicitly forbidden
by the license to use a CAL just for the application server. It's the number
of end-users that counts.

http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/faq.asp
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/multiplexing.asp

--
Jacco Schalkwijk
SQL Server MVP



> Hello. I am trying to get to the bottom of whether our SQL Server 2000
> Enterprise license needs to be CAL or per processor. For our INTRANET
> applications, it is completely clear and we are already fully licensed.
> But for our INTERNET web applications, this is where I am not clear.
> Here is the CURRENT licensing that we have for our INTERNET web based
> applications:
>
> FRONT-END APPLICATION SERVER [CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET]:
> Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition
> Windows External Connector License
> [Running IIS]
>
> BACK-END SQL SERVER CLUSTER VIRTUAL SERVER [BEHIND FIREWALL ON INTRANET]:
> Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
> SQL Server 2000, Enterprise Edition - CAL License
>
>
> We have three types of front-end INTERNET web applications built with
> ASP.NET. No end-user from the Internet ever connects DIRECTLY to the
> SQL Server database, all connections to the SQL Server are made via the
> front-end web application. Please review these three applications and
> let me know is our current licensing is in compliance, or if we have to
> purchase SQL Server PER PROCESSOR licenses:
>
> APPLICATION #1: This front-end application serves up SQL Server data on
> Library events and classes. A Library patron goes to the application
> web site and does a search on upcoming events and classes and gets the
> results displayed on a web page. The user is ANONYMOUS. The
> application which is running on the front-end application server, has a
> single SQL Server login to the SQL Server database on the other side of
> the firewall.
>
> APPLICATION #2: This front-end application serves up SQL Server data
> about GIS Property Images. A citizen homeowner goes to the application
> web site and logs into the web application to search for GIS information
> on their home. Their user account is stored in a table in SQL Server,
> but not a SQL Server login or Windows Login. The application which is
> running on the front-end application server, has a single SQL Server
> login to the SQL Server database on the other side of the firewall.
>
> APPLICATION #3: This front-end application servers up SQL Server data
> about individuals who are put in the County jail. An end-user from the
> City of Portland [different organization than the County] connects to
> the application web site and their user account [Windows account] is
> authenticated via Active Directory by the front-end application. The
> end-user then queries for data on County jailed individuals. Then
> end-user from the City of Portland has a verified CAL. The application
> which is running on the front-end application server, has a single SQL
> Server login to the SQL Server database on the other side of the firewall.
>
> Please let me know which, if any, of these three sample applications are
> covered with our current CAL-based SQL Server licensing plus the Windows
> Server 2003 with Windows External Connector.
>
> Thanks in Advance.
>


 
 
David





PostPosted: Thu May 20 16:56:12 CDT 2004 Top

SQL Server >> Need Help Determining SQL Server Licensing The rule is that under CAL licensing you have to ensure that you have a
licence for each end user or device that connects to the server whether
directly or indirectly via an N-tier application. Since you can't normally
control this over the Internet (except maybe where the system is only
accessible via a VPN) Processor Licensing is effectively the only option for
web-based access. That's my understanding.

More info here:
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/

If in doubt contact MS or your dealer.

--
David Portas
SQL Server MVP
--